Diabetic Macular Edema

The eye works like a camera. It has two parts, a lens and a film. The film layer lines the back wall of the eyes and is called the retina. It has arteries that provide its blood flow and veins that drain the blood. Diabetic changes are characterized by abnormally leaky blood vessels. This may allow fluid to accumulate in the retina and decrease the quality of vision (diabetic macular edema).

Patients who have this condition in an area of their retina not involving or threatening their central vision require no treatment. Those with swelling close to, but not involving their central vision may benefit from close observation, focal laser, or an intravitreal injection to decrease the risk of losing vision. Patients with swelling in their central vision benefit from an intravitreal injection to improve their vision and prevent further vision loss.

New onset visual loss may be a sign of increased swelling in the macula. Patients who experience a sudden onset of new floaters or decreased vision may be experiencing bleeding. Either of these complaints warrants seeing your retina specialist at Retina Care of Tampa prior to the next scheduled visit.

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